The Dining Room Studio

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Here is a collection of recordings made at The Dining Room Studio over the years. You can also hear a selection of covers by the band I play with, Marylebone Jelly by clicking here.

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10:32
Live video footage - Marylebone Jelly (2005) OK, so it's not audio, this is a video clip... I'm afraid I couldn't be arsed to do a video page yet!. It's rather large, 38Mb, but should be no problem as long as you are on broadband. It's a clip of my band, Marylebone Jelly, from a local gig we did in Nov 2005. Our normal vocalist wasn't able to do the gig, so our old vocalist "stepped into the breach" for one night... this is why it is here and not on the band website. This clip shows a couple of songs: Long Train Running and Play That Funky Music.... enjoy!
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5:12
All of This Time - Dave Boulden (2005) A very recent recording done in my studio... written, performed and recorded by myself. It's quite a personal song and is something of a statement to the women I've had serious relationships with in the past. It was all produced in CubaseSX3 using my Roland Fantom X7 for all the sounds and was all recorded thru my Yamaha 01x. Anyone with "keen" ears will notice the use of the Yamaha Pitch Fix plug-in (that comes free with the 01x) on my vocals. They didn't really need it all that much, but rather, needed a little tweaking since the melody is rather simple and legato and so any imperfections in my pitching would have stood out like a sore thumb.
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5:19
All of This Time (Remix) - Dave Boulden & Michael Müller-Philipp-Sohn (2005) This remix of the above track is the result of a collaboration between myself and the very talented Mick Phillips from East Germany. The collaboration came about during a conversation on the Fantomized forum. This version has a guitar solo created by a third forum member from Portugal (thanks Luis!).
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3:31
Kiss - Marylebone Jelly (1997) Recorded in the same session as Long Train Running. I think we managed to get around 6-7 tracks recorded that day for our demo tape to use when touting for gigs.
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3:19
Long Train Running - Marylebone Jelly (1997) Once again recorded on a Fostex R8, through a Behringer MX8000 mixer. We spent the previous evening miking up the drum kit and played with the set-up until we got a good sound. The following day, guitar bass and drums were recorded to seperate tracks in one go with me playing along on keyboards, and the vocalist singing along as a guide. Afterwards, the lead vocal was added and any mistakes overdubbed. Then backing vocals and keyboards were laid down before doing a mixdown the next day onto DCC.
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2:34
Bare Arms - Roger Bunn (1997) Multitracked on a Fostex R8, through a Behringer MX8000 mixer. Roger laid down an initial guide track on guitar which ended up staying in the final recording. Bass was added next. Then Roger laid down the vocal line followed by a second guitar part. Finally ride cymbal and maraccas were added to provide a rhythmic key to hold some consistency through the track. All instruments and vocals by Roger apart from the ride cymbal and maraccas rhythm track which was played by both of us (can't remember who played which though!). The song is also composed by Roger. The track is Roger's commentary on the machinations surrounding the Oklahoma City bombing. You can visit Roger's MIHRA site for the background to Bare Arms - The song about the stymied investigation into the Murrah bombing by following this link: http://www.mihra.org/2k/press.htm
Update: I was saddened to hear that Roger passed away on July 28th, 2005. I will sorely miss him. His personal website is still online: http://www.rogerbunn.com/. Have a read and see why I was happy to simply have been just one of his many friends.
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2:17
Tush - Parallel (1995) Same session. Yet another one of the "hoary old rock songs". It always seemed such a shame that this was such a short track as it was one of my favourites to play.
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3:19
Summer Of '69 - Parallel (1995) Same session. Another one of our "trade mark stomping" tracks. Ed used to complain bitterly when I had my Roland Alpha Juno2 as my second keyboard and used one of the stock organ sounds for the riff between verses. It was such a shrill sound that it could scalp you at 200 yards.
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3:24
Lonely This Xmas - Parallel (1995) Same session. This track originally started off as a bit of fun, but it soon became a firm fixture in the Christamas and New Year party set lists.
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4:46
Knocking On Heaven's Door - Parallel (1995) Same session. One of the few songs that was sung by "yours truly"... the other was our other original song "Soul City Woman". It was really only because the lyric and melody was so simple that I was able to manage a "passable" performance of this song. Due to the sound I used on this song in an arrangement prior to the one recorded here, it also went by the name of "The Milk Bottle Song"... I'll let you wonder why.
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3:58
I Want To Break Free.mp3 - Parallel (1995) Same session. Most entertaining when Ed did the "stick of chewing gum" impression of Freddie.... You'd know exactly what I mean if you ever saw it ;o)
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6:21
I Walked Alone - Parallel (1995) Same session. One of only two original songs the band played (the other was "Soul City Woman"). It was written fairly quickly one Saturday afternoon by myself and the guitarist at the time, Tony Dean. We had a married couple who used to watch us play fairly regularly, and the husband always used to request that we play this song. We were quite taken aback at how much he liked the track. It wasn't until years later that I married Karen, who was his wife back then but obviously several years divorced when I met her again, that I discovered it was Karen who loved the song and always made her then husband come up and request it!
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3:20
Hot Legs - Parallel (1995) Same session. Once again Ed's vocals really shine in this song. This became a real favourite for me to play once I got a synth with a half-way decent acoustic piano sound.
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3:19
Dancing In The Moonlight - Parallel (1995) Same session. Once again, "hoary old rock bands" may never play a gig without covering Thin Lizzy at least once!
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3:46
Dancing In The Dark - Parallel (1995) Same session. Our vocalist back then (Ed, who stayed in the line-up thru to Marylebone Jelly, but left a few years after I took my 4 years off) was just superb for gravelly rock vocals. This really did open up a lot of choice for stonking rock songs.
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3:09
Can't Get Enough - Parallel (1995) Same session. Parallel were a bit of a "hoary old rock band" at times, and no "hoary old rock band" is allowed to play any gig without covering at least one track by Free!
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4:07
Come Up And See Me - Parallel (1995) Same session. This was always a popular track at gigs. I suspect many bands have, and still do, play this track. My first experience of hearing this track live was when I was about 15 and watched Duran Duran play it at a gig in Hammersmith.
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5:35
Time - Parallel (1995) From the same session as Comfortably Numb above. Parallel was the band I was in and when these tracks were recorded we had been together for a few years. Soon after these tracks were recorded our guitarist left following a serious accident at work. Once we had a new guitarist, and a new bass player (The vocalist played bass aswell as singing, but took the brave, and definitely the right, decision to give up the bass and concentrate on vocals) we relaunched with a new name: Marylebone Jelly. Only two of us, myself and the drummer, are still around from the original Parallel line-up, and even both of us have had hiatuses away from the band. Again, this track features me on backing vocals, andf differently from the other tracks, features the "then" guitarist on lead vocals.
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6:53
Comfortably Numb - Parallel (1995) This one is from one of the first sessions using the Fostex R8. We recorded two Pink Floyd covers in this session. This version of Comfortably Numb was well gigged, and was quite popular in the Rock oriented pubs where we gigged regularly. As with any Pink Floyd track, it takes quite a while to perfect the arrangement as no Floyd track is ever straight-forward. This track features yours-truly on backing vocals... I wish I could sing as high still today!
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3:31
Time To Tell - Gotcha (1989) These three songs were not recorded in my studio, but rather in the Strood-based home studio that was owned by an extremely talented guy by the name of Ben Cooper. This track features a guitar solo by Ben that he had to make up on the spot... and what a superb solo it is! A year or two later, Ben was selling some of his studio gear, and it was his Roland R5 and Fostex R8 that I bought and still have in my studio today.
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4:00
Gotcha - Gotcha (1989) This was our signature track, and features a gorgeous pad sound at the start created by an incredibly "weedy-parpy" analogue synth expander (Siel Ex80) made to sound very lush by being processed thru a Yamaha SPX FX box using the "Symphonic" effect. A Roland R5 drum machine, the very same one I still own and use today, is responsible for the very solid sounding drums. Nearly all our songs were created in Steinberg Pro24 and Cubase on an Atari 520STFM.
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3:32
Reach For Me - Gotcha (1989) Gotcha was the band I was in during the late 80's. It was a fairly typical synth-pop duo that eventually became a trio. Gotcha featured myself on keyboards, Steve Austin on vocals, guitar and keyboards, and John Ainsley (if I've remembered his surname correctly) on backing vocals. I was quite lucky to hook up with Steve as he was a very talented pop vocalist and song-writer.